Friday, September 22, 2017

DF-to-DRFRPG game conversion: Additional Rules List

Here is the list of additional rules I think I need to list and summarize in a document for my players to refer to:

Charging Foes (Obstruction only) (Martial Arts)
Critical Hits (Basic Set)
Cross Parry (Martial Arts)
Extreme Dismemberment (Martial Arts)
Long Weapons in Close Combat (Martial Arts)
Mind Games (contests of Will only) (Martial Arts)
Multiple Blocks (Martial Arts)
Parrying with Two-Handed Weapons (Martial Arts)
Quick Readying Nearby Weapons (Martial Arts)
Rate of Fire (Basic Set)
Shoves with Weapons (Martial Arts)
Striking at Shields (Martial Arts)
Telegraphic Attack (Martial Arts)
Tip Slash (Martial Arts)
Tricky Shooting (Prediction Shot only) (Martial Arts)
and of course CP-based grappling.

That might be it. Possibly Damage to Shields, too, although we rarely use that in actual play.

Thursday, September 21, 2017

New Magic Item for DFRPG on Kickstarter Update

In case anyone missed it, my contribution to the DFRPG boxed set, Magic Items, has a blurb and a new magic item over on Kickstarter:

Shipping Update, & A Tome Of Magical Wonders

Scroll down for the Tome of Wonders!

Wednesday, September 20, 2017

Random Notes & Links for 9/20

Really busy day as part of a really busy week, so mostly I'm going to refer out today.

- Life Imitates Blog - And upside of having the blog, and the detailed summaries, is when they positively influence game. I'm pretty sure the next Felltower game session is going to feature exploration of one of the Danger Pockets simply because someone was reminded of it by reading my examples of what Danger Pockets are. It's not certain, as there is a lot to do in Felltower, but it's certainly an option. Had I stuffed that post into my "finish next week" pile, perhaps we'd have a different session.

- Big Bad / Short Fight - sometimes the big bad just gets wasted. This is why I like non-unique monsters! Killed my super man-scorpion-thing? It's okay, there are more! The PCs must have killed the same half-dozen slorn counters and orc minis and troll figures and so on over and over. Also, it's why those unexpected fights where some random NPC beats up the whole party or a nothing of a wandering monster derails all exploration as people run and hide are so fun.

- Suppression Fire - Doug has a new spin on Suppression Fire. Or at least on RoF. Of course, it's based on the Size and Speed/Range Table, because it's Doug. If it was me, it would be the Reaction Roll Table ("Very Good - wow, nice shooting Tex! You hit a whole bunch of them!")

- I forgot to mention there is a new DF item out - The Pagoda of Worlds. Since I have a lot to read and little time to read it, all work related (can you say CEUs?), I haven't gotten to this yet. I will get it and review it when I have a chance.

- I am still working my way through old posts replacing pictures no longer working through Photobucket. It's very slow going, as I need to be on my home PC when I stumble on the post, have the time to edit and search, and then do so. Sorry for all of the broken links. Had I know earlier Photobucket would ask for $300/year to do this thing, I would have switched fully over to Google's hosting immediately. But no, I wanted to diversify my dependencies. Silly me.

Tuesday, September 19, 2017

No Town Game

Another aspect of my game that mirrors the West Marches campaign is the idea of "No Town Game."

A couple of quotes sum it up:

"make town safe and the wilds wild — Having the town be physically secure (walled or in some cases protected by natural features like rivers or mountains) is very useful for making a sharp “town = safe / wilderness = danger” distinction. Draconian law enforcement inside town, coupled with zero enforcement in the wilds outside town, also helps. Once you are outside the town you are on your own."

"the adventure is in the wilderness, not the town — As per the discussion of NPCs above, be careful not to change the focus to urban adventure instead of exploration. "

Both of those describe the four "town" settings my PCs have dealt with: Falcon's Keep, Swampsedge, the pilgrim's camp (aka "Rumshackles"), and of course, Stericksburg.

To be fair, some of this is a basic feature of GURPS Dungeon Fantasy as-written: town is vague and resolved with die rolls and simple effects. Town is safe unless you choose to make a roll and blow it. Town is where adventurers gather and get a minimum of information of the world around them, enough to send them off on an adventure.

Mine is a big less minimal than that, since we've got a big rumors table and sages for hire and recurring town NPCs of mostly color-level importance. But it's otherwise the same: safe, abstract, and not a place where adventure happens.

Again, the reasoning is the same - if you make town a place of adventure, people will adventure there instead. There is always one more thing to do in town anyway, even when the PCs are leaving. Ask this one guy something. Buy one more potion. Check to see if one more spell stone is for sale. Double-check if everyone has enough rope. Check and see if there just happens to be one more hireling ready. Adding actual adventure will mean you spend more time in town and less in the dungeon. Adding important adventures means you'll turn the focus from the dungeon to the town.

And that's fine, for a town-centered game. Or a town-and-dungeon game. Or a game where dungeons provide clues and links and resources that influence town. But not for a game where the dungeon is the thing, and town is a way to allow people to replenish and recharge between delves.

Monday, September 18, 2017

Warhammer Fantasy Role-Playing 2nd edition Humble Bundle

Thanks to Erik Tenkar for pointing this out.

There is a Humble Bundle of Warhammer Fantasy Role-Playing game books.



$1 will get you the WFRPG rulebook, 2nd edition, in PDF, plus three books.

Higher tiers will get you more.

II went in for it - $1 for something to read on my Kindle on vacation. WHFRPG 1st edition made my head spin, with all of the misery of being a spellcaster, profession-hoping, and mechanics I couldn't quite understand right away. But it had nice flavor (flavour?) to it. You can throw in more for more books, or just to support the charities they're supporting.

Sunday, September 17, 2017

Danger Pockets

There is a very interesting series of web posts on a sandbox-style fantasy campaign called the "West Marches."

If you haven't read them, and you have any interest in sandbox-style play, it's worth reading them. You can start here:

Grand Experiments: The West Marches

I first discovered them a few years after I'd started running my DF campaign, Felltower. What's interesting to me is that many of the features of the West Marches game are also features of mine, in a case of parallel development. Or re-invention of the wheel. Or however else you'd term it. My game came later, and by a combination of accident, design, and emergent lessons of running a sandbox, I ended up with many of the same situations.

While I don't run a wide-open game featuring a large pool of players, I can't just run game on whatever day a few players are available to show up at my house, and I don't feature a wilderness-based area, the similarities really struck me. I read those posts and felt, hey, I do that. Hey, I realized that and changed to that. Hey, that happens in my games, too.

We started with very similar approaches. A modernized version of an old game (his was D&D 3.5 3.0, mine GURPS 4th edition). Minis. Tactical combat. Open rolling (although I still conceal a lot). Narrowed choices of character design but open access within those choices. Risk of death. Cross-player shared maps and knowledge to keep information from being siloed. A decided lack of NPC rivals willing to do the inherently foolish thing of walking open-eyed into extreme danger because you think there is money there.

I decided I'd finally sit down and take a look at some of the elements my game shares with the West Marches, and discuss them in the context of Felltower. Partly because I think it might make an interesting and helpful series of posts. And partly because it was a fun experiment for me to analyze my own game in light of someone else's game.

Today let's talk Danger Pockets.

Danger Pockets

My game in general, but the megadungeon Felltower in particular, has what Ben Robbins called "danger pockets." These are especially high-reward areas, which are often high-risk, difficult to access, difficult to find, or all three. The risk is much higher than the area around it. But I try to make the reward out of proportion to the risk, or at least well out of proportion to the surrounding area. They are static places, although they may feature mobile danger.

Sometimes they are really easy to find but getting in has some difficulty. They're places you can avoid for as long as you want - maybe forever - but if you want to get rich, one way is through those places.

Just like in the West Marches, people sometimes find these and then put them aside for "later," and "later" becomes "never."

Not everything is a "danger pocket." The big lizard man demon temple was a huge, epic fight, but not a "danger pocket." The dragon fought many sessions back was just a very dangerous encounter. The sword-spirit with his great magical sword wasn't a "danger pocket." Even the Lord of Spite isn't - he's an unavoidable problem that happens to have some treasure if you know where to go and get it. The dungeon isn't just broke wandering monsters and "danger pockets."

Interesting areas aren't all "danger pockets," either. The room of pools is interesting, and had an encounter, but wasn't really any more or less interesting than, say, the hall of murals and No Mana Zones or the apartment complexes or the weird temple. They weren't really out of line with what was around them. A statically located reward guarded with a challenge isn't a danger pocket. That's just normal danger for a sandbox.

But what is a good example of a danger pocket?

Good examples are: (* means it's been cleared or accessed)

- the Black Library*
- the draugr
- the "boss's" apartment complex*
- the double-doors in the "cavern area" past the "dragon cave."
- the big dragon
- the twinned temple*
- whatever is behind the repelling doors
- the force-walled temple in the Lost City
- the statue-puzzle "black door" (to the treasury)*
- the gate destinations (generally)

That's not all of them. That's just some.

The gate destinations are interesting. Either they are high-risk high-reward areas, or they're just access to new adventuring areas in general. I'm a little concerned they'll see very little actual adventuring, because by design they aren't set up for dipping a toe in to check the water temperature. You can't just pop in, look around, and get back out and come back when you're ready. Well, you can for some, but not all, and it's not always going to be clear which it is until you go for it.

But the one-and-done or enter easily/leave with difficulty places are "danger pockets" - high risk, but high reward. They'll wait for someone to take some risk to exploit it. And if you set them aside until "later," and only come back once you've reduced the risk to nil, odds are the treasure is not going to be as high-impact as if you'd gotten it first. Imagine if the PCs had solved the rotating statue puzzle right away, and cleared out rings of wishes and high-end healing stones and piles of coins and gems years back. And for reward, it was dangerous and tricky, required thought and a lot of travel around a dangerous dungeon (and thus some work), and carried well in excess of the amount of treasure anything else on the 2nd level could be expected to have.

I highly recommend using some "danger pockets" in your sandbox. Or even in a more linear campaign, so you can bring it back as a callback to earlier days. As in, "Hey, the key to the wizard's treasury must be the one behind that lethal series of magical traps we saw back in Dungeon #1!"


It's tricky as a player to guess what would count, or start interpreting encounters as "danger pockets." But once it's clear an area is especially dangerous and potentially especially rewarding, it's worth keeping in mind that there might be special rewards lurking there, too. Think static areas where something way more dangerous than what is around it lurks and waits for someone brave enough to take the risk to exploit it. Why I am going on about this? Because I half expect players to meta-discuss if something is a "danger pocket" or "just another encounter" to try to analyze risk to reward. Analyzing with only the information on the PC side of the screen can be deceptive - you can get a 100% logical conclusion that leads you astray because you're operating with far less than 100% of the actual data.



Long story short? You can avoid clear "danger pockets" for now, or forever. But there is usually better-than-commensurate reward for tackling them. Clear and obviously more-dangerous area probably have more reward, if you're willing to chance them.

Saturday, September 16, 2017

DFRPG Unboxings

In case you missed any of these from my sidebar, here are two looks inside the DFRPG physical boxed set:

DFRPG Unboxing

Dungeons Fantasy RPG for GURPS has arrived at the Attic!

What ones did I miss? Post links in the comments!
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